News and Events
February 26, 2016

#CelebrateBuiltHeritage - Why Does Built Heritage Matter to You?

"Built heritage is a form of art; built for the love of style, details, and materials, an expression of the trends of their time. I have had the pleasure of working on some very old and unique buildings in Winnipeg and am always awed by the beauty of the craftsmanship and the complexity of the construction given the limited equipment and resources available at the time. They just don't build like that anymore."
~ Alan Mann, certified Red Seal Journeyman Carpenter

"Built heritage matters because it is a record of our past, a reminder of our success and failure, a tangible testament to what can be achieved through hard work and determination. Built heritage lets us time travel into the past, walk with ghosts, reflect on how far we have come, and encourages us to aspire to greatness in the future."
~ Anonymous

"Historical buildings are the visible story of our lives - how we lived, what was imporant to us, and the ebb and flow of immigration and prosperity. It is important to maintain them to remind us of our history."
~ Peggy Barker, P. HEc.

"Built heritage helps to preserve the history of the community which is essential to helping people connect with the past. This is especially true when trying to impart the importance of Winnipeg's history to today's youth."
~ Anonymous
 
"The amount of decoration on the "heritage buildings" of 100 years ago appeals so much to me. We could not afford to do that in the present era of building. I am fortunate in being able to make my home in one of them. Looking out one of the huge crescent-shaped windows on the second floor of the now defunct Union Bank Building on Notre Dame Avenue, and across to the magnificient Winnipeg Electric Chambers, with the 17 lions atop protecting it, is a constant pleasure. These buildings were built to stand a long time!"
~ Herbert Stewart, retired Architect

"To look at built heritage is an opportunity to have a visual of the past. The architecture in Winnipeg covers many time periods and when one researches a specific period the visual experience of a histroic building assists with the understanding of events that took place.
When buildings are torn down, a strong tie to the past is gone. As we look at history and the impact that some buildings had in the evolution of the city and province, we can get a sense of the daily events that took place.
The buildings such as VIA Rail station where thousands of men and women departed to go to war - the First and Second World War. Private homes - Seven Oaks House and Dalnavert that give a glimpse of how people lived and the St. Boniface Museum where the first Grey Nuns established a hospital are all important to help understand the events in our history. The previous City Hall of Winnipeg and the physical relationship of the 1919 strike is gone, as are many buildings in Winnipeg. It is important to protect, preserve, maintain, and re-purpose historic buildings so that they are not destroyed for the future."
~ Marie Zorniak

"The built environment is a reflection of our values. It is directly built on our past, speaks to our present, and informs our future. Our built heritage is not just important, it is critical as a foundation for today moving forward to tomorrow."
~ Christopher Beauvilain

"I think built heritage is important because of the stories buildngs can tell us about the past. The people who lived and worked in those buildings helped make our city and our country what it is today, and we can learn from both their failures and successes as we look to the future of our communities. Heritage buildings are a beautiful and magnificient reminder of the legacy of our society."
~ Laura McKay, Heritage Officer at Heritage Winnipeg Corp.
 
"The era of Winnipeg heritage construction was most prominent from 1895 to 1914. Twelve sites such as churches, cemeteries, and a few government buildings appeared before that time in a 40 year span beginning in 1845. Of the 74 heritage sites in the 2015 Doors Open Winnipeg event, 62 of them were built after streetcar service began in 1882. Employees of the Winnipeg Street Railways built 224 wooden streetcars in a 7 year period from 1907 to 1914. A number of these cars were still in service over 40 years later in their final year - 1955. Streetcars were the only public transportation system Winnipeg had from 1882 to 1918. Had streetcars not been here, owners, employers, adn purchasing customers would have had to walk to these high rises to conduct business. Very few would have dons so, so most of these heritage buildings would never have been built. Winnipeg today would be about the size of Selkirk, with 12,000 residents, not 712,000 like we have toady. The streetcars enlarged our population from 8,000 in 1882 to 150,000 in 1912, making Winnipeg Canada's third largest city at the time. Six years later, the first transit buses arrived. When are the streetcars going to receive the same cherished recognition that our heritage buildings receive? As far as I know, there are only two other streetcar operators left besides myself. We have been waiting 35 years to get #356 back on track, we won't be around much longer." 
~ Brian K. Darragh, retired Winnipeg Transit driver/streetcar operator

 


February 25, 2016

2016 Annual Preservation Award Winners

The 2016 Annual Preservation Awards & Launch of the First World War Digital Memorial

 


On Monday, February 15, 2016, Heritage Winnipeg presented the 31st Annual Preservation Awards ceremony as well as the launch of the First World War Digital Memorial Project. The event was held in the Rotunda of the historic Union Station, VIA Rail Canada's Winnipeg Station, to celebrate National Heritage Day and Louis Riel Day.
 
The First World War Digital Memorial, as displayed on the east wall of the rotunda.

Since 1985, Heritage Winnipeg has sponsored an annual awards program that seeks to recognize those people dedicated to the protection, restoration, and conservation of Winnipeg's built heritage. Awards are also given to owners of heritage structures who seek to sensitively restore their buildings so that they become a productive element of the economical, cultural, and social fabric of the community. 
 
Cindy Tugwell, Heritage Winnipeg's Executive Director, speaks at the beginning of the ceremony.
 
Awards are given in three categories: Heritage Conservation, Distinguished Service, and Youth. For more information about the criteria for each of these awards, visit the Heritage Winnipeg website here.
 
Members of the Living History Society were also in attendance for the event.
The winners of this year's awards program are as follows: 
 

Heritage Conservation Awards

The Province of Manitoba 

&

Ager Little Architects

Heritage Winnipeg Board Member, Lawrence Prout, presents the award to Ryan Derksen, accepting on behalf of the Province of Manitoba.
 
Heritage Winnipeg Board Member, Lawrence Prout, presents the award to Marnie Gartrell, accepting on behalf of Ager Little Architects.
 
for the Institutional Conservation of the Old Law Courts at 391 Broadway. For their commitment to upgrade the plumbing system and provide barrier-free washrooms at the Old Law Courts located at 391 Broadway while ensuring the preservation of the character-defining elements, such as the marble floor tiles, marble panels, doors and frames, and the original washroom fixtures. Built from 1912-1916, this is one of the most important Law Courts buildings in the Province, and one of the best examples of the Neo-Classical style designed by Provincial Architect, Samuel Hooper.
 
 
 

The City of Winnipeg

Heritage Winnipeg President, Jordan van Sewell, presents the award to Councillor Shawn Dobson, accepting on behalf of the City of Winnipeg.
 
Councillor Shawn Dobson accepts the award with special thanks to the Planning, Property, and Development Department and Project Officer, Evan Wiebe.
for the Institutional Conservation of the City Council Building at 510 Main Street. For the sensitive replacement of the roof and re-pointing of the exterior of the City Council building located at 510 Main Street. Built in 1964 and recognized as a modernist heritage building, this work affirms the City's long-term commitment to maintaining heritage buildings in Winnipeg.
 
 
 
 

Roslyn Properties/Globe General Agencies

 
 
 
Heritage Winnipeg President, Jordan van Sewell, presents the award to Diane Glover, Senior Property Manager, accepting on behalf of Globe General Agencies.
 
Diane Glover, Senior Property Manager for Globe General Agencies, accepts the award.


for the Residential Conservation of Roslyn Court at 40 Osborne Street. For their commitment to maintain Roslyn Court located at 40 Osborne Street. Recent rehabilitation work included the roof, copper panels, exterior masonry, and painting. This Queen Anne Revival style building, constructed in 1908, is recognized as a National Historic Site and it continues to be a viable and integral part of Osborne Village.
 
 
 
 
 

The Yoon Family

Heritage Winnipeg President, Jordan van Sewell, presents the award to Harry Yoon, accepting on behalf of the Yoon Family.
 
Heritage Winnipeg President, Jordan van Sewell, presents the award to Harry Yoon, accepting on behalf of the Yoon Family.
for the Commercial Conservation of the Lauzon Block at 339 William Avenue. For the main floor restoration work completed in the Lauzon Block located at 339 William Avenue. This 3-storey historic building was built in 1905 and recently featured in a Heritage Winnipeg blog article. The restoration work focused on the pressed-tin walls and ceiling coverings.
 
 
 

Special President's Award

 Longboat Development Corporation

&

Stantec Architecture Limited

Jeff Chipman accepts the award on behalf of Longboat Development Corporation. Michael Banman accepted the award on behalf of Stantec Architecture.

for the Commercial Conservation of the Mitchell-Copp facade at 315 Portage Avenue. For the sympathetic protection, stabilization, and preservation of the 1919 historic Mitchell-Copp facade located at 315 Portage Avenue and thereby significantly enhancing the streetscape of Portage Avenue.
 
 

Distinguished Service Awards

The Friends of Dalnavert Museum

Heritage Winnipeg Past President, David McDowell, presents the award to Adele Hempel, Chair, accepting on behalf of the Friends of Dalnavert Museum.
 
Adele Hempel, Chair, accepts the award on behalf of the Friends of Dalnavert Museum.
The Friends of Dalnavert Museum. L-R: Cindy Tugwell, Heather Laser, Brock Capell, Susan Moffatt, Ines Bonacossa, and Adele Hempel.
for their dedication and commitment to the protection and re-opening of Dalnavert Museum at 61 Carlton. For their dedication and commitment to the protection and re-opening of the restored Museum and Visitor's Centre located at 61 Carlton Street for future generations. The museum, built in 1895, was the home of former Manitoba Premier, Hugh John Macdonald, the only son of our first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. 
 

First World War Digital Memorial Project

Thank you to the City of Winnipeg and the Thomas Sill Foundation for their generous support of this project.
Councillor Brian Mayes from the City of Winnipeg speaks to the inspiration and groundwork for the First World War Digital Memorial Project.
Bruce Tascona, Chair of the Military History Society of Manitoba, speaks to the importance of remembering the sacrifices of the First World War.
Jeremy Choy of Pattern Interactive explains the technology behind the installation.
Actor and playwright, Tim Higgins, reads from his piece "Winnipeg's Great War Legacy --- A Reflection".
 
Actor and playwright, Tim Higgins, speaks to the legacy of the Great War in Winnipeg.
Brendan McKenn from the Manitoba Underground Opera introduces the organization's performers.
Lynlee Wolstencroft, Soprano & Megan Dufrat, Pianist, perform "Au pays où se fait la guerre" by composer Henri Duparc.
The First World War Digital Memorial is now on display at Union Station.
Members of the Living History Society in period costume.
Volunteers in First World War uniform.
 


February 11, 2016

In Memoriam: Garry Hilderman



It is with great sadness that Heritage Winnipeg acknowledges the passing of Garry Hilderman, a long-time supporter of and advocate for Winnipeg's built heritage. Before his passing, Garry was on the boards of both the Friends of Upper Fort Garry and the 389 Main Street Heritage Corporation (which owns and maintains the Millennium Centre at 389 Main Street). In his lifetime, he was also involved with the Forks Foundation, CentreVenture, the Historic Winnipeg Advisory Committee, and the Fort Whyte Centre for Environmental Education.

Through his career as a landscape architect, Garry was involved in many landmark projects that Manitobans are proud of today. These include the Provencher Bridge, Oak Hammock Marsh, Whiteshell Provincial Park, The Forks National Historic Site, Fort Whyte Alive, the Leo Mol Sculpture Garden, and of course, Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park. He was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects and became a member of the Order of Canada CM on June 30, 2010.

A celebration of Garry's life will be held later in the year. Donations in honour of Garry can be made to upperfortgarry.com or 204.987.4351.

February 6, 2016

HW Summer Full-time Student Position

Heritage Winnipeg is now accepting resumes for one full-time summer student position under the Canadian Heritage Young Canada Works in Heritage Institutions program.  The position would start in May 2016 and run for 16 weeks from Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm.  If you are interested in summer employment please email your information to the Executive Director at cindy@heritagewinnipeg.com.

Click here for more information about the position.
 


February 2, 2016

2016 Annual Preservation Awards

Heritage Winnipeg would like to thank everyone who participated in our
31st Annual Preservation Awards Ceremony

in celebration of
National Heritage Day and Louis Riel Day

and the Launch of the
First World War Digital Memorial Project
on
Monday, February 15, 2016
at the
VIA Rail Winnipeg Station (former Union Station)
Rotunda, 123 Main Street

A list of all award recipients, guests, and speakers, along with photos will be posted shortly.
Ceremony Commences at 2:00pm

For more information, please contact us at info@heritagewinnipeg.com or 204.942.2663 or visit the website at www.heritagewinnipeg.com.


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